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Recent Blog Entries: Accessibility

Infrastructure improvements in six Ottawa neighbourhoods

October 30, 2018 Written by a HealthBridge guest blogger Accessibility, Advocacy, Cars, Cities, Cycling, Impact, Livable Cities, Public Transit, Walking Post a comment!

Since 2015, we have been working with residents in six lower-income neighbourhoods to identify improvements needed to make them better places for pedestrians, cyclists and public transit riders. This has involved door-to-door outreach, sharing circles, active transportation audits, the formation of resident-led working groups, dot-mocracy to prioritize the top needed improvements, and pop-up projects intended to demonstrate how the neighbourhood would improve if the needed improvement were implemented.

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Livable Cities Dispatches: WUF9

March 13, 2018 Written by a HealthBridge guest blogger Accessibility, Advocacy, Livable Cities, Public Spaces, Urban Planning, Walking Post a comment!

Hear Livable Cities partners share highlights and learnings from World Urban Forum 9. 

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Redefining Amazing

January 11, 2017 By Debra Efroymson Accessibility, Dhaka, Happiness Post a comment!

It is too easy to believe that only those of us with "respectable" professions make a contribution in the world, and to believe that we should be entitled to all the respect...

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Carfree Day Celebrations

September 21, 2016 By Debra Efroymson Accessibility, Advocacy, Cars, Cities, Cycling, Dhaka, Exercise, India, Livable Cities, Public Spaces, Urban Planning, Walking Post a comment!

Our events include various types of playful activities in the streets, to raise awareness of how much more space—and fun—we could have if our streets weren’t clogged with cars.

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Promoting accessibility and inclusivity: big words, but can we achieve them?

August 22, 2016 By Debra Efroymson Accessibility, Cities, Dhaka, Livable Cities, Urban Planning Post a comment!

When a city is completely inaccessible for people with disabilities, where do we start? Or should we just throw up our hands and declare defeat? 

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