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The 31st SEA Games in Vietnam: Smoke Free

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The 31st SEA Games in Vietnam: Smoke Free

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Vietnam hosted the 31st South-East Asia (SEA) Games in 2022. The Vietnamese government is committed to protecting people from secondhand smoke which is reflected in the implementation of Smoke Free SEA Games. The 31st SEA Games were held in Vietnam from May 12 to 23, 2022. The 31st SEA Games featured 40 sports with 526 different events and welcomed about 10,000 people from 11 Southeast Asian countries, namely Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor-Leste and Vietnam.

Hand fans with information about the harmful effects of secondhand smoke will be distributed widely to athletes, coaches, spectators, organizers, managers, volunteers and the general audience; the fans will help people to cool down during the hot summer months.
Hand fans with information about the harmful effects of secondhand smoke will be distributed widely to athletes, coaches, spectators, organizers, managers, volunteers and the general audience; the fans will help people to cool down during the hot summer months.

The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism issued decision No. 985/QD-BVHTTDL on the implementation and propagation of the Law on Prevention and Control of Tobacco Harms, including a smoke-free environment, at the 31st SEA Games in Vietnam. HealthBridge cooperated with the Department of Legislation – Ministry of Culture, Sport and Tourism, Vietnam Tobacco Control Fund, and the Organizing Committee to implement the 31st Smoke Free SEA Games. More than 700 volunteers were trained by HealthBridge on smoke-free sports events, 8000 leaflets on the harmful effects of secondhand smoke were printed, and radio and video programs about Smoke Free SEA Games were broadcasted at competition venues.

Implementing the 31st Smoke Free SEA Games promotes a healthy environment and protects athletes, coaches, spectators, organizers, managers, volunteers and the general audience from exposure to secondhand smoke.